The New Autocrats

Authoritarianism is on the rise in Eastern Europe

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Democracy in Eastern Europe has paved the way for a new breed of Autocrats to strengthen their authoritarian grip on their respective countries. Led by Hungary's President, Viktor Orban, governments in Poland, Romania and the Czech Republic are reining in the freedom of the press, attempting to pack the judiciary and accused of being awash in corrupt practices.

Farmers complain of decaying infrastructure preventing them from getting goods to market. In Romania, secular citizens worry about the growing power of the Orthodox Church and vanishing borders between church and state. In Poland, protesters voice their opposition to the dismantling of the country's constitution. Will populism unravel democracy and create a new autocratic Iron Curtain?